California State Association of Counties: Study Shows Huge Economic Benefits from SB 1

February 28, 2018

For Immediate Release

SACRAMENTO – A report released today by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) found that the economic impacts of the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017—Senate Bill 1 (SB 1) – will be significant and reach every single community in California.

Specifically, the analysis calculated SB 1’s total, 10-year economic impact at $183 billion in economic activity, including supporting or creating 68,000 jobs annually. SB 1 provides about $5 billion annually to transportation projects, split equally between the state and local governments. The funding will be used to make road safety improvements, ease traffic congestion, fill potholes, repair local streets, freeways, tunnels, bridges and overpasses and invest in public transportation in every California community.

Certain politicians are behind an effort to repeal SB 1. A statewide ballot measure for the November 2018 California ballot is currently in the signature gathering phase.

The following statement can be attributed to Matt Cate, Executive Director, California State Association of Counties:

“SB 1 will have a massive positive impact on the state including significant economic activity and the creation of well-paying jobs, life-saving safety improvements, and an enhancement of overall quality of life. Counties will have the ability to repair and maintain roads and bridges that for too long have been neglected. It would be unwise to unwind the benefits SB 1 already has brought to California by repealing it in November. The ARTBA study reinforces the benefits a reliable and safe transportation network can have on communities across the state.”

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Paid for by the Coalition to Protect Local Transportation Improvements, Yes on Prop. 69, sponsored by business, labor, local governments, transportation advocates and taxpayers
Committee Major Funding from
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