Statement: Fix Our Roads responds to Republican #GasTaxtrophe

Fix Our Roads responds to Republican #GasTaxtrophe events:

Sacramento — The following statement can be attributed to the Fix Our Roads coalition, a coalition of local governments, business, labor and transportation advocates who worked to pass SB 1 (transportation funding) in April of this year. This statement can be used as our response to Republican-led #GasTaxtrophe events on November 4, 2017.

“California drivers will have safer, less congested roads thanks to SB 1. Every single community in California will receive funding to make road safety improvements, fill potholes, and repair local streets, freeways, bridges and overpasses. And SB 1 comes with strict accountability requirements to reduce bureaucracy and ensure funds only go to transportation.” –Fix Our Roads

  • For a map of SB 1 transportation improvement projects across the state and in local communities click here.
  • For a list showing how much SB 1 funding will flow to every city and county in CA, click here.

Background about SB 1:

SB 1, passed in April by the state Legislature, provides more than $5 billion annually in new funding to make road safety improvements, fill potholes, and repair local streets, freeways, bridges and overpasses. The new SB 1 funding will not be bogged down in bureaucratic red tape. A special auditor will be appointed to ensure SB 1 funding is going where it’s supposed to. SB 1 includes provisions to expedite projects and reduce inefficiencies and waste. SB 1 also includes a provision to repay funds that were diverted from transportation during the recession.

Most important, voters will be asked to vote on a statewide ballot proposition in 2018 to solidify new revenues protections into our state constitution to ensure this new funding is spent on transportation projects only.

Why SB 1 is needed:

Bad roads cost drivers every year. Today, California drivers are paying an additional $762 per year in vehicle maintenance costs resulting from driving on crumbling roads.

There is a backlog of $130 billion in needed road repairs, $59 billion for state highways; and $73 billion for local streets and roads.