In Case You Missed It: San Diego Union Tribune and Santa Rosa Press Democrat Urge Legislature to Act on Transportation Funding This Year

August 17, 2015

Sacramento – Now that the state Legislature has returned for its final month, editorial boards, along with members of the Fix Our Road coalition, including cities/counties/business groups/transportation groups, are calling on the Legislature to get serious about addressing California’s transportation crisis.

From the San Diego Union-Tribune: “Road-repair funds must be protected from diversion” August 16, 2015

  • “…a vast bipartisan coalition has emerged that makes it likely the state government will undertake a major program of repairs and improvements.
  • “The [Fix Our Roads] group’s seven priorities are mostly common-sense calls for improving ease of transportation of major goods to help the economy and requiring full transparency in divvying up funds and deciding what projects to do. One proposal, stands out in importance: ensuring transportation revenues are use only for transportation-related purposes. In 2010, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Legislature approved a complex maneuver that diverts nearly $2 billion a year from road repairs to the general fund. Fuel taxes from off-road vehicles and truck-weight fees are also used for general spending.”
  • “All elected officials should oppose any package of bills that don’t have ironclad protections against such diversions. The use of billions of dollars in gas tax revenue for general purposes is in direct defiance of the public’s will, as expressed in state ballot measures approved in 2002 and 2006 that were meant to yield better roads – not more money to be used at the whim of the governor and Legislature.”

From the Santa Rosa Press Democrat: “PD Editorial: Paying a high price for bad roads” August 16, 2015

  • “Motorists are paying a hidden tax for bad roads.”
  • “Vehicle repairs attributable to potholes and crumbling pavement cost hundreds, in some places thousands, of dollars a year above and beyond routine maintenance.”
  • “California’s roads are only getting worse, and lawmakers should bear in mind that, if roads are improved, any new taxes would be at least partially offset by fewer auto repair bills.”